X
GO

Water School

Archive by tag: supplyReturn
What is Possum Kingdom Lake?

What is Possum Kingdom Lake?

Possum Kingdom Lake, located on the main stem of the Brazos River northwest of Fort Worth, was the first water supply reservoir constructed in the Brazos River basin. Located in Young, Palo Pinto, Stephens, and Jack counties, the construction of the Morris Sheppard Dam was begun in 1938 and completed in 1941 with the aid of the Works Progress Administration Program.Possum Kingdom Lake covers an area of 16,716 acres with 219 miles of shoreline. The reservoir holds approximately 750,000 acre ...
Read More

What is water conservation?

Water conservation is the careful management and use of water to assure it provides the best long-term benefit to the public. Conservation is preservation of water from loss, damage or neglect. It includes processes that help provide long-term access to clean water by preventing unnecessary water usage and waste.Conservation can include preserving, controlling and developing water resources, both surface water and groundwater, and preventing water pollution. Water conservation is pract...
Read More

Can the Brazos River Authority sell water to anyone?

The Brazos River  Authority is permitted to sell water to any organization within the basin for the purposes listed in the organizations water permit from the state.  These purposes are: municipal, industrial, agricultural, and mining.  Outside the Brazos River basin, legislation must be passed to allow an interbasin transfer of water to another river basin.
Read More

How much water is the Brazos River Authority permitted to sell in Texas?

The Brazos River Authority has obtained the right to provide up to 705,000 acre-feet of water basin-wide from the 11 system reservoirs and the rivers within the watershed. This right was obtained through a standard water permitting process set by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and its predecessor agencies and through contractual negotiations.  The Authority has contracted for sale 700,000 acre-feet of water.
Read More

What is riparian doctrine?

In Texas, surface-water rights are governed by duel doctrine that take widely differing approaches: riparian and appropriation. Riparian doctrine was introduced to Texas more than 200 years ago during the Spanish colonial period and has since incorporated elements of English common law.Under this doctrine, property owners have a right to draw water from a stream or water body that crosses or borders their land. They are allowed to take water for a reasonable use and are protected against unreaso...
Read More

Why should I conserve water?

@media (max-width: 960px) { .img_right { clear: both !important; float: inherit !important; margin: 0 auto !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; } }Conserving water can be one of the easiest and most effective ways to positively impact our environment as well as our communities. Water conservation can take a variety of forms and each of them is important in the process of preserving one of the Earth’s most valuable resource...
Read More

Is rainwater harvesting legal in Texas?

Yes, rainwater harvesting is legal in the State of Texas. According to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, most if not all domestic water needs can be met by collecting rainfall from the roofs of homes and outbuildings. A permit to collect rainwater is not needed.
Read More

What is unappropriated water?

Unappropriated water is the state water remaining in a watercourse that is available for appropriation (ie permitting) under the rules of TCEQ.  Or in other words, it is the amount of water that could be available for use from a water source after all existing water rights have been fully taken into account.
Read More

What is an adjudicated water permit?

Over the past 200 years of Texas history, the state has experienced several different laws governing the use of surface water. These differing laws often created conflict in water rights claims. In 1967, the Texas Legislature directed the predecessor agency of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to clarify this system and classify Texas water rights by Certificates of Adjudication. These certificates were each assigned a priority date based on when the water use first occurred.
Read More

What is a term permit?

A term permit is a water permit issued by the State of Texas usually to industry, mining or agricultural enterprise for a specific amount of water that will be available for specific amount of time (usually 10 years).  This permit does not have a priority date nor is it considered to be a property right and is subject to non-renewal or cancellation at the end of the term.
Read More

Must I obtain permission to use Texas surface water?

Yes, permission is required in order to ensure that there is enough water for all in need.  The state has established procedures and requirements for obtaining access to state surface water.  Water use may be sought through application for a state permit through the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) or through the contract purchase of water from an already permitted entity.The Brazos River Authority holds numerous state issued permits for water use and provides this water to other...
Read More

What is an off-channel reservoir?

An off-channel reservoir is a water supply lake built next to or near a river.  Off-channel reservoirs are considered by some to be environmentally friendly, lessening the impact on fish and other wildlife by avoiding the need to place a large dam directly on the main stem of the river.An example of an off-channel reservoir is the Brazos River Authority’s planned and permitted Allens Creek Reservoir, near Houston. For more information about Allens Creek, click here.
Read More

What is a water supply lake?

As the name implies, water supply lakes are built primarily to provide a place to store water for Texas residents, communities, businesses, agriculture, industry and others who all depend on water to survive and thrive. Such lakes are especially vital during periods of drought, when other sources of water may be limited.  Many of Texas’ flood control lakes serve a secondary purpose as a water storage facility.  However, reservoirs designed for water supply, do not necessarily also provide flood...
Read More

What is yield?

Yield refers to the amount of water produced by a water treatment process or the quantity of water that can be collected for a given use from surface or groundwater sources. The yield may vary depending on the proposed use, the development plan, location of the water source, and economic considerations.
Read More

What is appropriation doctrine?

This doctrine has its roots in the 1800s, when Texas officials determined riparian doctrine did not address the needs of more arid parts of the state. Since the late 19th century, land acquired from the state has used prior-appropriation doctrine instead of riparian when considering water rights.Under this approach, water rights are based on seniority.  In other words, one’s water rights are based on the date one applied for the right, with older claimants having seniority. However, those pre-e...
Read More

What is a priority date?

The Texas Water Code provides for water permitting in a “first in time; first in right” basis.  This practice establishes a place in line for water users with the earliest permits being guaranteed priority to take water over those with more “junior” permits.  This date is important as it determines who priority to divert and use water first.
Read More
Search
Categories

The information provided on this site is intended as background on water within the Brazos River basin. There should be no expectation that this information is all encompassing, complete or in any way examines every aspect of this very complex natural resource.

If you have questions about a post or would like additional information, please contact us or call 888-922-6272.

Tags
parasite channel lake level PAM potable fertilizer sanitation golden algae estuary flood climate mitigation wildlife turbidity hydrilla water treatment usgs water use canoe effluent infection consumption streamflow storage water planning drilling municipal filter riverine oxygen main stem corps tributary water reservoir water supply mission precipitation landscaping invasive plants watercourse limestone industry taste chlorine corps of engineers employment possum kingdom costs mainstem stream releases aquifer gage medicine inland use map water clarity rights septic direct re-use streamflow brackish solids planning inundated soil clarity hydropower industrial boating fork bottled water maps environment hydrology wetlands reservoirs system agriculture xeriscape TCEQ canoeing contaminants monitor salt permit acre-feet wastewater biosolids dissolved solids rain gas electric companies subwatershed evaporation lake levels lake acre-foot smell indirect re-use river jobs algae pollutants E. coli speaker allens creek reservoir runoff contract water rights farming water code fish kill spillway wetland authority camping lawn governance surface water groundwater agricultural sewage E coli well bed and banks basin septic system watershed recreation golden algea gate minerals impound water plants quality beneficial use depth appropriation kayak hunting supply dock water cycle environmental subsidence district flood pool chlorides tdh water quality flood control lake anaerobic mgd granbury volume spring legislation emergency use cfs hydrologic cycle gulf pharmaceuticals bay measure marsh salinity conservation aerobic electricity drinking water subsidence sludge fishing insurance drought sediment calcium classification treatment lakes organic ground water habitat dam Board riparian