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Granger Lake is the Ideal Outdoorsman Destination

Granger Lake is the Ideal Outdoorsman Destination

The reservoir is located in East Williamson County on the San Gabriel River, between Taylor and Granger. Just 24 miles east of Georgetown. 

U.S. Army Photo

Construction began on Granger Lake in October of 1972 and the multi-purpose reservoir was placed into operation in January 1980. Granger Lake is one of 24 reservoirs that are operated and maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District and is one of 11 reservoirs that make up the Brazos River basin.

The Laneport Dam (Granger Lake Dam) was designed to provide flood control, water supply storage, recreation, and fish and wildlife development. Granger Lake provides two hiking trails, four parks for day or night use, two swim beaches, one primitive campground, and ample opportunity to fish and hunt on the water and surrounding grounds.

Recreation
Recreation at the lake can be found on hiking trails, parks, and more than 4,000 acres of surface area water. 

Hiking Trails:
•    Comanche Bluff Hiking Trail: a designated hike and bike trail only. No motorized equipment or horses are allowed on this trail. It is located on the south side of the lake with access from Taylor Park.
•    Willis Creek Park Equestrian Trail: located on the north side of the lake, Willis Creek is a designated equestrian trail with hiking and biking allowed. Access to this trail is available for $4 per day.

Parks:
•    Wilson Fox Park: camping and day-use, swim beach
•    Taylor Park: camping, day-use park, access to Comanche Bluff hiking trail
•    Willis Creek Park: camping and day-use park, group shelter/camping, equestrian trail
•    Friendship Park: day-use only park, group shelter/camping, swim beach

If roughing it is more your style, Granger Lake has one primitive camping area located at the end of the Comanche Bluff Hiking trail called the Fox Bottom Primitive Campground. The campground has eight campsites with each one having a designated tent pad, lantern hanger, and fire pit. 

All of the parks offer something different. If you are interested in playing sand volleyball or horseshoes on your visit, contact the gate attendant for a volleyball and net or horseshoes at no extra charge. 

Park entrance hours are from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. More information on park fees and usage can be found here Fees (army.mil).

Fishing and Hunting: 

U.S. Army Photo

Crappie is the most popular sportfish in this reservoir. Large numbers of legal-size crappie are present. Channel, flathead, and blue catfish are present in good numbers. White bass are also present and provide a consistent fishery. Largemouth bass are present in small numbers and provide a marginal fishery.

Granger Lake boasts a 10,800-acre Wildlife Management Area (WMAs) surrounding the lake. The WMAs are licensed by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD). They provide hunting, hiking, mountain biking, and bird watching. 

To hunt at Granger Lake, you must purchase a TPWD Public Lands Hunting Permit along with a valid hunting license and appropriate stamps. The primary game species for shotgun hunting are dove, quail, waterfowl, rabbit, and squirrel.

Archery and Crossbow hunting for feral hogs are also allowed year-round.

Deer hunting is permitted through the Public Hunting Area (PHA). It becomes available around July of each year. For more information on these hunts check Texas Parks and Wildlife PHA E-Post Card Hunts

No hunting is allowed in park areas and bowfishing is not allowed within 600 ft. of any park. 

Whether you are a bird watcher or a hunter, a swimmer or a boater, a camper or a fisherman, Granger Lake has something for everyone to enjoy. 

For more information about Granger Lake and its recreational opportunities, check out this list:

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