X
GO

Water School

Archive by category: Authority Programs & ServicesReturn
What is Possum Kingdom Lake?

What is Possum Kingdom Lake?

Possum Kingdom Lake, located on the main stem of the Brazos River northwest of Fort Worth, was the first water supply reservoir constructed in the Brazos River basin. Located in Young, Palo Pinto, Stephens, and Jack counties, the construction of the Morris Sheppard Dam was begun in 1938 and completed in 1941 with the aid of the Works Progress Administration Program.Possum Kingdom Lake covers an area of 16,716 acres with 219 miles of shoreline. The reservoir holds approximately 556,340 ...
Read More
What is Lake Granbury?

What is Lake Granbury?

DeCordova Bend Dam and Lake Granbury were constructed by the Brazos River Authority and are maintained and operated by the BRA as a source of water supply.Construction of the project began in December 1966 and was completed in September 1969. The reservoir provides 129,011 acre-feet of storage capacity for conservation of flood and storm waters to meet requirements of municipalities, industries, agriculture and mining.  The reservoir has a permitted yield of 64,712 acre feet. ...
Read More
Where is Lake Limestone?

Where is Lake Limestone?

Lake Limestone, located on the upper Navasota River in Limestone, Robertson and Leon counties, is a water supply reservoir built by the Brazos River Authority in 1978. Construction of the reservoir was made possible through the sale of water to Texas Electric Utilities to be used by their lignite-burning electric plants in the area.  To view a copy of the Lake Limestone state permit, click here.Water from the reservoir is supplied for similar use at a NRG steam-electric plant just...
Read More
What is the Texas Clean Rivers Program?

What is the Texas Clean Rivers Program?

The Texas Legislature created the Clean Rivers Program in 1991 when it passed the Texas Clean Rivers Act. Legislators’ goal was to push Texas towards comprehensive water planning and management to ensure the future quality of the water supply.The state designated the Brazos River Authority as the lead agency to conduct water quality assessment and Clean Rivers Program (CRP) planning in the Brazos River watershed. Every one to three months depending on location, the BRA tests water for everythin...
Read More
What are system operations?

What are system operations?

Authorized by the state, the Brazos River Authority’s system operations permit allows the BRA to sell up to 705,000 acre-feet of water basin-wide from the 11 system reservoirs and the rivers within the watershed. The system permit allows the BRA to draw the water from any of the reservoirs and rivers included in the system allowing the BRA to utilize the sources with the largest storage of water at any specific time.
Read More

Does the Brazos River Authority provide speakers for my civic group?

Yes, the BRA’s Speaker’s Bureau will provide staff to address a variety of water related topics free-of-charge to civic groups and community organizations. Groups frequently request such topics as water planning, water and wastewater treatment, flood management and future planning. For more information, go to the Bureau’s web page or call the BRA's Public Information Office at 888-922-6272.
Read More

Why do you charge a fee to build a dock on the reservoir?

The on-water facility fee to place a dock on a BRA reservoir basically allows the permit holder to build and maintain a permanent structure over BRA property (the lake bed). It also gives the BRA the ability to ensure that the docks that are constructed on the reservoir are safe. The permit fee is not a tax, but a one-time fee.  There are no longer annual fees to maintain a dock on a BRA reservoir.  For an on-water facility permit application, click here.
Read More

If I own lakeside property, can I build a dock on a BRA-owned reservoir?

Lakeside property owners can build docks on a BRA-owned reservoir if they complete an On-Water Facility Permit application and pay the relevant fees for inspection of the facility plans and completed work.  Lake regulations set requirements property owners must meet when building a dock.  Details on these regulations may be found in Section 7 of the BRA regulations.Permit applications may be obtained at each reservoir's office or by going to the appropriate website: Possu...
Read More

Can I camp at Brazos River Authority reservoirs?

Yes, BRA parks have campsites that are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Camping is free year-round at Lakes Granbury and Limestone, as well as September through May at Possum Kingdom Lake.Each BRA park offers amenities ranging from tables to shelters and grills and pits. Many of the parks also offer nearby restrooms and showers. If you prefer something a little less rustic, private groups offer cabin and RV sites. For more information about camping opportunities at BRA reservoirs, ...
Read More

Do I need a boating permit on the lake? On the river?

Motorized boats, sailboats extending 14 feet or longer, and vessels documented by the U.S. Coast Guard all must show proof of state registration when operating on Texas public waters, which includes the Brazos River, according to Texas law. This law does not apply to non-motorized rubber rafts, kayaks, punts, rowboats, or other vessels under 14 feet in length that have the ability to be paddled, oared, windblown, or poled. To learn more about water vessel requirements of public Texas waters, cli...
Read More

What regulations cover fishing at Brazos River Authority reservoirs?

Under Texas state law, a fishing license is required for all public waters. There are a few exceptions to this requirement. Those younger than 17 years of age, whether Texas residents or non-residents, are exempt. Also, Texas residents born before Jan. 1, 1931 are exempt from license requirements.  Texas residents over the age of 65 may buy a Senior Resident Fishing License.  For more information about fishing regulations in Texas, go to the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife website.
Read More

Are you allowed to hunt on the Brazos River and its tributaries?

Since the Brazos River is a public stream, the 938-mile stretch of water is available for anyone to hunt.  Many people live along the river banks, and hunters must be mindful of their safety when shooting both firearms and arrows. To avoid violating Texas trespassing laws by straying onto private property, hunters should be careful where they walk on the riverbed. They are advised to not cross the boundary of the riverbed where woody plants begin to grow — this is dubbed the &ldq...
Read More

What type of water transportation systems does the Brazos River Authority operate?

The BRA operates two pipeline systems that transport water from reservoir storage to areas where it is needed. The Williamson County Regional Water Line carries raw water from Lake Stillhouse Hollow to Lake Georgetown, serving the residents of Georgetown, Round Rock, and the Brushy Creek Municipal Utility District. The East Williamson County Water Transmission Line moves water supply from Lake Granger to a potable water treatment plant.
Read More

How many potable water treatment plants are run by the Brazos River Authority and whom do they serve?

The Brazos River Authority owns and operates the East Williamson County Regional Water System serving the cities of Taylor, Hutto and Thrall, the Jonah Special Utilities District and the Nowak Water Supply Company. The BRA also contracts to operate the Sandy Creek Water Treatment Plant in Leander and the Lee County Fresh Water Supply District No. 1, serving the community of Dime Box.
Read More
Search
Categories

The information provided on this site is intended as background on water within the Brazos River basin. There should be no expectation that this information is all encompassing, complete or in any way examines every aspect of this very complex natural resource.

If you have questions about a post or would like additional information, please contact us or call 888-922-6272.

Tags
contract subsidence sewage estuary E coli possum kingdom rights calcium hydrology allens creek reservoir treatment fish kill riparian agricultural soil storage reservoirs Board maps potable hydrologic cycle authority bay costs gage organic corps environment water use quality sludge inundated employment chlorides turbidity PAM effluent chlorine inland taste channel gulf water quality recreation wetland biosolids dock dam insurance water supply spring municipal mitigation drought subwatershed aerobic runoff industry ground water contaminants environmental oxygen clarity direct re-use acre-foot map bottled water lake farming sanitation canoeing classification lawn electricity spillway agriculture flood wastewater riverine permit granbury drilling water main stem sediment invasive plants fork dissolved solids mainstem industrial wetlands landscaping E. coli parasite subsidence district habitat lakes wildlife lake levels hunting emergency use TCEQ algae bed and banks salt brackish septic system flood pool stream acre-feet supply USGS streamflow kayak mission aquifer water cycle minerals smell watershed pollutants streamflow fertilizer legislation measure golden algea groundwater xeriscape jobs water plants filter electric companies rain camping lake level reservoir water planning fishing corps of engineers governance monitor releases climate cfs golden algae gas drinking water solids hydrilla indirect re-use salinity consumption boating flood control lake evaporation surface water meta tag mgd limestone planning water code canoe conservation gate beneficial use speaker septic impound river well appropriation pharmaceuticals marsh depth infection water treatment basin water clarity volume hydropower watercourse precipitation tributary medicine water rights anaerobic system use